Birthplace Legal Definition

The place of birth (POB) or place of birth is the place where a person was born. This place is often used in legal documents with name and date of birth to uniquely identify a person. The practice of whether this place should be a country, territory or city/city/place differs from country to country, but often the city or territory is used for passports of native-born citizens and countries for foreign-born people. Some countries attach less or no importance to the place of birth and instead use other geographical features for identity documents. For example, Sweden has been using the concept of födelsehemort (“place of birth”) since 1947. This means that the residence of the baby`s mother is the registered place of birth. [2] The location of the maternity ward or other physical place of birth is considered irrelevant. Knowing your place of birth can be essential for filling out legal documents or replacing important documents such as your original birth certificate. Read on to learn more about when your official place of birth is needed and what you should list when you provide this information. The place of birth is the place where a person was born. This place is often used in legal documents with name and date of birth to uniquely identify a person. The place of birth is not necessarily where the parents of the new baby live.

If the baby is born in a hospital in another place, that place is the place of birth. In many countries, this also means that the government requires that the birth of the new baby be registered at the place of birth. In other countries, for example in Sweden since 1947, there is a concept of födelsehemort, which means that the residence of the baby`s mother is the registered place of birth. The location of the maternity ward or other physical place of birth is considered unimportant. Sometimes the place of birth automatically determines the nationality of the baby, a practice often referred to by the Latin term jus soli. Most often, it depends on the nationality or nationality of the parents. There can be confusion about the place of birth if the birth takes place in an unusual way: when babies are born by plane or at sea, difficulties may arise. In general, in these cases, the nationality of the children, according to the indications “Jus soli”, follows the flag of the aircraft or ship. In order to obtain a new copy of these documents, you must provide this information as well as other data requested on the respective application form.

In addition, you can find this information on a birth certificate or passport if you need to verify your POB to fill out a form. In this case, you will have to enter the county or municipality where you were born, not where you lived. This will usually be the place where the hospital where you were born is located. As a result, you may have a different birthplace than where you grew up. There are a few documents that require you to indicate your place of birth. With respect to passports, if the place of birth is to be a country, it is usually determined that the country that currently has sovereignty over the actual place of birth, regardless of when the birth actually took place. [1] The place of birth is not necessarily where the parents of the new baby live. If the baby is born in a hospital in another place, that place is the place of birth. In many countries, this also means that the government requires that the birth of the new baby be registered at the place of birth. It`s important to understand what exactly is meant by your place of birth when you get important records and fill out passport applications.

Should you indicate your place of birth (your family home at the time) or the precise location of the hospital where you were born? Switzerland also uses the term “place of origin”. A child born to Swiss parents is automatically assigned the parent`s place of origin with the same surname, so that the child receives either the mother`s place of origin or his father`s. A child born to a Swiss parent and a foreign parent acquires the place of origin of his or her Swiss parent. A Swiss passport and identity card indicate the place of origin of the holder, not his place of birth. In Japan, registered domicile is a similar concept. In some administrative forms, the applicant`s “country of birth” may be requested. It is important for the applicant to determine whether the information requested relates to the applicant`s “place of birth” or “nationality at birth”. For example, U.S. citizens who were born abroad and acquire U.S.

citizenship at the time of birth will be U.S. citizenship at birth, while place of birth will be the country where the actual birth takes place. A place of birth (POB) is the place where a person was born. This information is used for many necessary purposes, such as proof of citizenship, birth certificates, and is listed in a number of important identification documents. There can be confusion about the place of birth if the birth takes place in an unusual way: when babies are born by plane or at sea, difficulties may arise. The place of birth of such a person depends on the legislation of the participating countries, which includes the nationality of the aircraft or ship, the nationality(s) of the parents and/or the location of the aircraft or ship (if the birth takes place in the territorial waters or airspace of a country). In some [vague] countries (especially america), the place of birth automatically determines the nationality of the baby, a practice often referred to by the Latin term jus soli. Almost all countries outside the Americas instead assign nationality based on the nationality(s) of the baby`s parents (called jus sanguinis).